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About ePortfolios

What is an ePortfolio?

A portfolio is a collection of work that provides information about the person who creates it. An ePortfolio is an electronic portfolio.  ePortfolios can demonstrate a student’s efforts, progress, and achievements gathered over the course of a student's academic career, or ePortfolios can be used by faculty to document accomplishments, publications, research and other experiences. 

In simplest terms, an ePortfolio is a collection of artifacts. Artifacts are things people create as part of their academic work, as part of their professional careers, or in pursuing personal interests. These may be documents such as a Word or PDF files, PowerPoint presentations, web pages, audio, video, graphics, paintings, sculptures, architectural designs, drawings, charts, and any number of other creations.  

 These items, stored as artifacts, may be assembled into various formats that can be:

  • shared with potential employers.
  • used as evidence of accomplishments/skills for applications.
  • used to create a personal portfolio that can be shared.
  • used in University assessment or program accreditation.

The intended audience may be a faculty member who is assessing the portfolio, a prospective employer, a committee of one's peers, or some other entity.  

Electronic portfolio systems also provide for the collection of achievement data over time and are useful for the development of statistical reports that track individual, course, program, and institutional-level progress.

 

ePortfolio Processes  


  • Collect: an ongoing process of adding artifacts to your portfolio.
  • Select: selecting artifacts from your collection to present as evidence of your learning, achievement, experiences and other work.
  • Reflect: a critical examination of your learning, experiences or other work in an effort to understand and improve your work by seeing the connections that are part of the process of learning.
  • Connect: connecting with others who may be assessing your work, or who may be providing advice.
  • Build: putting together a collection of artifacts into a presentation portfolio
  • Publish: the finished output of the building process where the portfolio is ready to be viewed and can be shared with the intended audience.  

The intended audience may be a faculty member who is assessing the portfolio, a prospective employer, a committee of one's peers or some other entity.  

Electronic portfolio systems also provide for the collection of achievement data over time and are useful for the development of statistical reports that track individual, course, program, and institutional-level progress.

implementing : Implementing Electronic Portfolios: Benefits, Challenges and Suggestions (PDF, 638 KB)

(EDUCAUSE Quarterly, Number 1, 2008)  

Assessing : Assessing the Future: E-Portfolio Trends, Uses and Options in Higher Education (PDF, 124 KB)

(Volume 2009, Issue 4)